J C Sum

Author Archives: J C Sum

2

Electronic Kabuki Drop Systems

Note: It would be best to first be familiar with the Basic Components of the Kabuki Drop to better understand the systems explored below.

Modern designs of the Kabuki Drop use electronic systems that use an electric current to activate the drop point mechanism.

The Kabuki Drop can be triggered by a switch and can also be hooked up to a DMX control panel or other split connectors. DMX or DMX512 (Digital Multiplex) is a standard for digital communication networks that are commonly used to control stage lighting and effects.

Gerriets Kabuki Drop

Photo Credit: Gerriets

The benefits of electronic Kabuki Drop systems are that they can be triggered remotely, far away from stage and each individual drop point can also be controlled individually if desired. Electronic systems provide precise releases that can be programmed into a DMX control panel and integrated with an elaborate perfectly-timed lighting and special effects sequence.

Some reliability problems with electronic systems that result in a failure for a complete Kabuki Drop include a drop in voltage when firing multiple drop units, faulty electronic parts, communication errors or malfunctions with the DMX program.

Many models of Electronic Kabuki Drops are also noisy with a distinct loud clicking or buzzing sound upon activation.

Electronic Kabuki Drops can be expensive. Renting a system can cost up to hundreds of dollars and purchasing a system will cost thousands.

While each system features different type of catches, latches, pins, hooks and release mechanisms, most electronic kabuki drops generally use a solenoid as the main activation mechanism.

However, the solenoid can take on two forms, namely:

 

Disclaimer: This is a free resource site for educational purposes. To better illustrate points made in the articles, images have been used to accompany the information. Photo credits and links to the source material are given where applicable.

If you are a copyright holder for any of the images and do not want your image used in this resource site, please contact us at info(a)magickabuki.com and we will remove the image within 24 hours.

The authors accepts no responsibility for damages or injuries resulting from the fabrication or performance of any of the Kabuki Drop methods described in this website.

 

2

Linear Solenoid Kabuki Drops

What is a Solenoid?

In its basic form, a solenoid is a long, thin tight coil of wire that produces a uniform magnetic field inside the coil pocket when an electric current is passed through it.

A Linear Electromechanical Actuator (LEMA), or simply Linear Solenoid, includes a plunger designed to fit into the solenoid coil pocket. This plunger is typically made from a ferrous square or round metal bar.

When an electrical current is passed through the coil of wire, it behaves like an electromagnet and the plunger is “pulled back” or attracted towards the center of the coil by the magnetic flux setup within the coil’s body.

It is generally spring-loaded so the plunger returns to its neutral position when the power to the solenoid is cut.

The concept of a linear solenoid is to convert electrical energy into a mechanical pushing or pulling force or motion, hence the term “electromechanical actuator”.

Generally, in engineering and in the context of Kabuki Drop systems, when the term solenoid is used, it refers to a linear solenoid.

The solenoid, which is cylindrical in shape, can be purchased at large general hardware stores or electronic parts stores.

Kabuki Drop Linear Solenoid

Typical Linear Solenoid

For more detailed technical information on linear solenoids, visit: G.W. LISK Company Inc

Electronic “Pull Pin” Kabuki Drop

This a basic linear solenoid Kabuki Drop system that has a pin secured to the plunger in the form of a threaded rod that is screwed into the plunger head.

The solenoid cylinder is mounted and encased into a housing (a box made of plastic or metal) and the plunger pin extends out of the housing through a hole drilled through the side of the housing.

The entire housing is clamped onto a truss bar and this serves as the drop point for the Kabuki curtain.

The curtain is hung on the pins of the drop points via grommets fitted across the top edge of the curtain.

A cross section view of the solenoid cylinder is shown below.

Kabuki Drop Solenoid Top View Final

Image Credit: Magic Kabuki Drop

When electricity is passed through these solenoids, the plungers retract into the housing, causing the pins to be pulled out of the Kabuki curtain which subsequently falls to the floor.

Kabuki Drop Solenoid Top View 2

Image Credit: Magic Kabuki Drop

Kabuki Drop Solenoid System Front View

Image Credit: Magic Kabuki Drop

Electronic “Lever Release” Kabuki Drop

A linear solenoid can also be used to release a lever that holds up the Kabuki curtain instead of simply retracting a plunger pin as described in the basic solenoid system above.

It can also be used to pull open a gate latch or custom-fabricated arm.

DIY Kabuki Drop

Linear Solenoid Used to Release Safety Pin of a Marine Shackle
Photo Credit: Tom Howard (As posted in the Blue Room forum)

DIY Kabuki Drop (2)

Linear Solenoid used to Open a Gate Lock that Releases a Curtain
Photo Credit: Connection Pointe Production Team

Solenoid Kabuki Drop 2

Photo Credit: Sew What? Inc

Solenoid Kabuki DropRelease Solenoid Previously Manufactured by Flints


magicfx power drop

Magic FX’s Power Drop
Photo Credit: MagicFX

Kabuki-Solenoid

Photo Credit: Rent What? Inc

China Kabuki Drop

Lever Arm Solenoid Kabuki Drop Manufactured in China

chabuki

Photo Credit: Chabuki Curtain Release System

Patent

Patent for an Electronic Lever Release Kabuki Drop
Photo Credit: Jesus Chuy Fragoso

Electronic “Shake & Drop” or “Rolling Pole” Kabuki Drop

This is a modern version of the traditional “rolling pole” Kabuki Drop but uses a linear solenoid to trigger a spring loaded gate latch to rotate the pole with drop points instead of a pull cord.

Check out a Double Kabuki Drop in action using an electronically-powered modern day “Rolling Pole” Kabuki Drop system in the video below:

One manufacturer that offers a variation of this system is Showtex. Their system is described in their operation manual here.

The Showtex system uses a solenoid system that drops an aluminum bar with drop points (pegs) at a downward angle to effect the curtain drop.

Show Tex Kabuki Drop

Photo Credit: Showtex

Electronic “Pins & Loops” Kabuki Drop System

The video below describes an electronic version of the “Pins & Loops” Kabuki Drop system. Instead of a pull cord as used in the manual version, this system uses a tensioned-spring to pull all the pins from the loops to release the curtain.

Unlike all other electronic systems, which requires the use of multiple individual solenoid drop point units, this system uses only one linear solenoid that keeps the spring pulled open when the Kabuki Drop is set up. When triggered, the solenoid releases the spring that pulls all the pins from the loops and activates the curtain drop.

Disclaimer: This is a free resource site for educational purposes. To better illustrate points made in the articles, images have been used to accompany the information. Photo credits and links to the source material are given where applicable.

If you are a copyright holder for any of the images and do not want your image used in this resource site, please contact us at info(a)magickabukidrop.com and we will remove the image within 24 hours.

1

Electromagnetic Kabuki Drop Systems

Electromagnetic Kabuki Drop systems do not use linear solenoids but use solenoids as an electromagnet lock.

Unlike permanent magnets that are magnetic in their natural state, electromagnets are ferrous metals that only become magnetized when an electrical current is passed through them.

This characteristic allows electromagnets to act as a locking system when they are energized. When the electrical current is cut, the electromagnets magnetic powers cease allowing for a release in the locking system.

This is similar to the system used in electromagnetic doors in buildings for security purposes.

The benefits of an electromagnetic lock Kabuki Drop system are that it an easier electronic system to build as compared to linear solenoid systems. It is also easier to set up than most other systems and it is relatively silent when activated.

The downside is that it uses a lot of electricity and the constant electric current required to keep the electromagnets on can shorten the lives of the power cables.

“Electromagnetic Lock” Kabuki Drop

As the name suggests, a basic electromagnetic lock Kabuki Drop system uses electromagnets as a lock mechanism.

Each drop point comprises of a holding magnet (or electromagnet) and an armature plate.

ElectromagnetHolding Magnet

Magnet Armature

Armature Plate

The armature plate is a ferromagnetic plate with a fixing hole that allows it to be attached to the kabuki curtain. It is usually attached to the cloth via rubber grommets.

The holding magnet will possess magnetic properties when energized. When the current passes through the magnet, it will cause the armature plate to be attracted to the magnet. This creates a locking action that holds the kabuki curtain in place.

During set-up, the holding magnet is clamped onto the flying bar. The armature plate, that is securely fastened onto the curtain is then attached, one by one, onto the respective holding magnets by means of magnetic attraction.

Electromagnetic Kabuki Drop

Photo Credit: Event Staging and Presentation Support Ltd

When all the drop points are set up, the flying bar is raised up above the stage and the curtain is suspended open.

Upon the cutting off of the electric current supply, the holding magnet demagnetizes and releases its grip on the curtain, thus allowing the curtain to fall to the floor.

“Electromagnetic Catch Release” Kabuki Drop

This system uses an electromagnetic lock system in a different way.

Instead of directly using the holding magnet to attach the curtain to the drop point, the holding magnet holds up a hook with arm lever where the curtain hangs from.

The magnet releases the hook with arm lever when electricity is applied to the unit; a sprung plate ensures release even if a light load is applied.

EK2

Electro Kabuki: EK2
Photo Credit: Electro Kabuki

Powa Kabuki Drop

Powadrop
Photo Credit: Powa Productions

Disclaimer: This is a free resource site for educational purposes. To better illustrate points made in the articles, images have been used to accompany the information. Photo credits and links to the source material are given where applicable.

If you are a copyright holder for any of the images and do not want your image used in this resource site, please contact us at info(a)magickabukidrop.com and we will remove the image within 24 hours.

1

Double Kabuki Drop System

As the name implies, the Double Kabuki Drop features two drop activation sequences. The curtain first starts off gathered or rolled up and is held in place at the top of the stage proscenium (on the flying bars).

Activating the curtain drop the first time will open up the curtain so that it covers the stage. Activating the curtain drop a second time will drop the curtain to the floor revealing what is on stage.

A Double Kabuki Drop can be activated either manually or electronically. Any system of drop points can be adapted as a double drop.

The underlying method for any double curtain drop is the need for two sets of drop points. There also needs to be an extra cloth “hammock” that will hold the curtain gathered up in place at the start.

The cloth “hammock” acts as a basket for the curtain. One long edge of the cloth “hammock” is permanently secured to the flying bar or Kabuki system support bar/ backboard (if there is one). The other long edge of the cloth “hammock” is attached to the additional drop points of the Double Kabuki Drop units.

Double Kabuki Drop System

Image Credit: Magic Kabuki Drop

Double Kabuki Drop Set-up

Alternative Set-up for the Double Kabuki Drop on the Same Flying Bar
Image Credit: Electro Kabuki

The first drop releases the cloth “hammock” so that it falls open and allows the curtain to drop open.

The second drop releases the curtain to fall to the floor.

Instead of a cloth “hammock”, you can also use multiple straps or even wire cables to hold up the gathered/ rolled up curtain. If the curtain is very long (height), you may need to mount the Double Kabuki Drop points on another flying bar so that the cloth “hammock” forms a large “basket”

Reference:

 

Disclaimer: This is a free resource site for educational purposes. To better illustrate points made in the articles, images have been used to accompany the information. Photo credits and links to the source material are given where applicable.

If you are a copyright holder for any of the images and do not want your image used in this resource site, please contact us at info(a)magickabukidrop.com and we will remove the image within 24 hours.

The authors accepts no responsibility for damages or injuries resulting from the fabrication or performance of any of the Kabuki Drop methods described in this website.

 

1

Build, Buy or Rent Kabuki Drop Systems

If you require a Kabuki Drop for your next show, production or special event, you essentially have three options:

  1. Build a System
  2. Buy a System
  3. Rent a System

The option you choose depends on your needs, constraints and preference.

If you are producing a multi-million dollar touring concert, you should go with a high-end professional system that is supported with an experienced team.

However, there are many smaller events and shows that do not require or have the budget for professional systems with a team. In which case, a DIY solution or renting a system for a one-off event may be a better option.

kabuki-1-840x560Photo Credit: BPM-SFX

CONSIDERATIONS

The choice of building, buying or renting the Kabuki Drop depends on a variety of determining factors. Some questions to ask yourself include:

  • How large is the Kabuki Drop?
  • What sort of fabric is used for the curtain?
  • How many times will the Kabuki Drop be used?
  • Is there ample time to set up and test the Kabuki Drop at the venue?
  • Is the Kabuki Drop going to be used at a fixed location or as part of a touring show that needs to be set-up/ tore down frequently?
  • Do you have the manpower required to set up/ tear down and activate the Kabuki Drop?
  • How significant is the role that the Kabuki Drop plays in your show, production or event?
  • How much time do you have before you need the Kabuki Drop for your show, production or event?
  • Do you have the skills and tools necessary to build a Kabuki Drop?
  • Do you have the skills to troubleshoot, maintain and use a professional Kabuki Drop system?
  • What is your budget?

Answers to the above questions will help determine which option may be more suitable for you.

Budget

One of the biggest factors to consider will be the budget that you have to work with.

There are two factors for financial consideration. One is the initial investment and the other is the ongoing cost.

  • Building your own Kabuki Drop system will generally cost the least.
  • Renting a Kabuki Drop system will be more expensive than building one but you would incur rental cost each time you require it. This cost can accumulate if you are using the system multiple times.
  • Buying a Kabuki Drop system requires the highest initial investment with some ongoing costs such as maintenance or storage. However, if you are using the system multiple times, the investment may be worth it as the costs are amortized over a period of time/ uses.

Here are specific considerations for each option:

BUILDING A KABUKI DROP

While building a Kabuki Drop does not require the technical skills of the “American Chopper” team, an aptitude for wood work, handling of tools and building of things as well as the availability of a properly equipped workshop are a must.

The size of the Kabuki drop can be a factor when building a system. If the curtain is very large, you will need sufficient space to build and test the drop.

Your time should also be factored into this consideration. You will need time to design, plan, build and test the system. If you do not have a lead time sufficient to build and test the system, you are likely better off buying or renting a system.

Research

The first step is to research for Kabuki Drop methods, systems and designs.

Some resources include:

 

Choosing, Designing & Building the System

Your research should help you decide on the Kabuki Drop method you can/ want to build; for example, whether it is a manual or electromechanical linear solenoid system.

Plan out exactly what you need and how to build the system. This includes having a set of building plans, materials & tools list.

Come up with a production timeline to ensure you have a timetable for building, testing and troubleshooting the system.

If you do not have a theatre venue to work in, it is advisable set-up some kind of suspended horizontal support to replicate a flying bar to test the curtain drop under “real working” conditions.

Get familiar with the system. Understand its idiosyncrasies and learn how to make adjustments and troubleshoot as necessary to get the system working perfectly.

 

BUYING A KABUKI DROP

The benefits of buying a Kabuki Drop from a manufacturer is that you are investing in a professional system.

A professional system means it has been developed with expertise, research & development, prototyping, time and resources. You are generally guaranteed a better system than one you could build in a few days. But, understandably, it comes with a higher price.

You will likely only buy a system if you are going to use the Kabuki Drop on a regular basis or have a venue that you would like to install the Kabuki Drop in as a permanent special effect fixture.

Research

As always, the first step is to research what options are available to you. Professional systems can include manual and electronic Kabuki Drops.

Get some basic understanding of the different types of systems on the market and compare their pros & cons. For example:

  • Some systems may be elaborate and can be controlled digitally through a DMX control board but require a long set-up time and are expensive.
  • Some systems are very basic but inexpensive.
  • Some systems may be lightweight and pack small while some systems require ATA cases to transport the equipment safely.
  • Some systems are very easy to set-up while some may require a bit more expertise and experience.

Be sure to select a system that suits your needs and not one that seems the most expensive or has the most features.

Contact the Manufacturer/ Reseller of Kabuki Drop System

Contact the manufacturers or resellers of different systems and request for product info and prices, if the information is not available online.

A list of manufacturers of professional Kabuki Drop systems include:

MANUAL KABUKI DROP SYSTEMPro Magic Kabuki Drop System
LINEAR SOLENOID KABUKI DROP SYSTEMSGerriets
Rose Brand
Chabuki
iWeiss
Magic FX
Rent What? Inc.
Showtex
SGA
Joseph C. Hasen Co.
Drape Kings
ELECTROMAGNETIC LOCK KABUKI DROP SYSTEMSElectro Kabuki
ESP Support

Buy the System and Learn How to Use it

Once you have all the pertinent information on hand and have worked out your budget, purchase the system.

Note, it will still take some time for the delivery of the Kabuki Drop and you will need additional time to make the curtains and learn how to use the system. Be sure to factor this into your lead time when buying the Kabuki Drop.

 

RENTING A KABUKI DROP

If you require a Kabuki Drop for a one-off event or show, renting the system may be the best option.

If you are organizing an event and have an appointed event producer, you can have him/ her source for a vendor for you and make all the necessary arrangements.

If you are self-producing an event or show and require just the Kabuki Drop, you can source for an event production or technical service provider. You can also look for a company that specializes in drapes for theatrical productions.

Do a Google search or ask for recommendations if you have any friends in the event or theatre industry.

What to Look Out For?

Renting the system generally includes the support team to set up/ tear down and execute the curtain drop so it is a hassle-free option.

As you will unlikely be using the Kabuki Drop system yourself, you do not really need to be concerned with the type of the Kabuki Drop System used.

What is more important is the reliability of the provider as well as the system they are using.

Some questions to ask a potential rental provider include:

  • What is the cost of the Kabuki Drop (based on the size of curtain you need)?
  • How long will it take to set up?
  • How experienced are they in Kabuki Drops? What past shows/ events have they done?
  • What type of Kabuki Drop system are they using? Any particular brand?
  • How reliable is the system and what happens if the system fails or the curtain does not drop completely?

Based on the answers given, you should be able to assess which company would be best for you.

Here is a quick guide as to help you decide whether you should build, buy or rent a Kabuki Drop System:

Determining FactorsBUILDBUYRENT
Large Kabuki DropNOYESYES
Heavy Kabuki Drop FabricNOYESYES
Repeated Use of SystemYESYESNO
Use of System at Fixed Location
YESYESNO
Manpower for Set-up/ Tear Down/ ActivationYESYESNO
Significant Role of Kabuki Drop in Show/ EventNOYESYES
Long Lead Time to Production/ EventYESYESNO
Possess Skills & Tools for Building Kabuki Drop
YESNONO
Possess Skills for Troubleshooting/ Maintenance YESYESNO
High BudgetNOYESYES

Read Previous Topic:
Ideas for Kabuki Drops

Read Next Topic:
References

Kabuki Drop Resource Contents

Disclaimer: This is a free resource site for educational purposes. To better illustrate points made in the articles, images have been used to accompany the information. Photo credits and links to the source material are given where applicable.

If you are a copyright holder for any of the images and do not want your image used in this resource site, please contact us at info(a)illusionbookstore.com and we will remove the image within 24 hours.

The authors accepts no responsibility for damages or injuries resulting from the fabrication or performance of any of the Kabuki Drop methods described in this website.

1

Kabuki Drop Reference Information

Here is a comprehensive list of Kabuki Drop reference information that were used when researching, compiling and writing this Kabuki Drop resource.

History of the Kabuki Theatre/ Kabuki Stagecraft & Curtain Drop/ Evolution of the Curtain Drop

Edo period. Wikipedia. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Expression in Kabuki: Kabuki Maku (curtains). Invitation to Kabuki. Japan Arts Council. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Hamatani, Hiroshi. The Nature of Kabuki and Bunraku Scenery. The Asiatic Society of Japan. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Shun’ichirō, Kanai. History of Kabuki Sets. GloPAD. Japanese Performing Arts Resource Center. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Kabuki.” Wikipedia. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Lombard, Frank Alanson. “Kabuki: A History.” TheatreHistory.com. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Leiter, Samuel L. “Historical Dictionary of Japanese Traditional Theatre.” Scarecrow Press, 2006. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Petersen, David. “An Invitation to Kagura: Hidden Gem of the Traditional Japanese Performing Arts.” 2007. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Leiter, Samuel L. “A Kabuki Reader: History and Performance.” M.E. Sharpe, 2002. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Leiter, Samuel L, and Brandon, James R. “Kabuki Plays on Stage: Darkness and Desire, 1804-1864.” University of Hawaii Press, 2002. Retrieved on 9 Feb 2015.

Halford, Aubrey S, and Halford, Giovanna M. “The Kabuki Handbook: A Guide to Understanding and Appreciation.” C. E. Tuttle Company, 1956. Retrieved on 9 Feb 2015.

Ernst, Earle. “The Kabuki Theatre.” University of Hawaii Press, 1974. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Leiter, Samuel L. “The Art of Kabuki: Five Famous Plays.” Courier Corporation, 1999. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Scott, Adolphe Clarence. “The Kabuki Theatre of Japan.” Courier Corporation, 1955. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Reynolds, Andy. “The Tour Book, Second Edition: How to Get Your Music on the Road.” Cengage Learning, 2013. Retrieved on 9 Feb 2015.

Wood, Bethany, and Hamilton, Tim. “Elements of Production.” Narukami – The Thunder God (University of Wisconsin – Madison, University Theatre’s Spring 2010 Production). Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Kabuki Glossary (H~J).” Kabuki21.com. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

The appearance and utilities of a traditional set for the Kabuki performance of Aoto Zōshi Hana no Niskiki-e by Kawatake Mokuami.” PDF. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

 

Basic Components of the Kabuki Drop

Screen Frames.” Screenchange.com. Chris Hitchens Ltd Screen and Stage Engineering. Retrieved on 20 Mar 2015.

Megan. “The Art of the Kabuki.” Sew What? Inc. Blog. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Grommet.” Wikipedia. Retrieved on 20 Mar 2015.

How to Easily Install a Grommet in Fabric by www.creativedish.com.” YouTube video. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Liz, Johnson. “How to Install Metal Grommets.” Sew4Home. Retrieved on 20 Mar 2015.

Kabuki Drop System Operation Manual.” Risam for show. Gerriets. Retrieved on 20 Feb 2015.

Lynda. “Focus On: Single Kabuki Drapes.” Sew What? Inc. Blog. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Gerriets.” Gerriets. Retrieved on 20 Mar 2015.

Manual Kabuki Drop Systems

Kabuki Curtain Drop (How To Build a Manual Drop.” YouTube video. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Drop curtain system.” ControlBooth forum. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

The Ins And Outs Of The Kabuki.” Sew What? Inc. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Lynda. Focus On: Poor Man’s Kabuki.” Sew What? Inc. Blog. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Kabuki Drops.” PAPERCLIP. Retrieved on 15 Feb 2015.

Cloth Drop.” Blue Room technical forum. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

CLS Studding Timber Suppliers.” Chiltern Timber Supplies Ltd. Retrieved on 19 Mar 2015.

DIY Kabuki Drop.” Johnfromarran.org.uk. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Electronic Kabuki Drop Systems

Linear Solenoid Actuator.” Basic Electronics Tutorials. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

What Is A Solenoid Plunger?” wiseGEEK. Conjecture Corporation. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Design Guide for Linear Solenoids.” G.W. Lisk Company Inc. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Solenoid.” Wikipedia. Retrieved on 17 Mar 2015.

Electro Holding Magnet.” Industrial Magnetic Systems. Kendrion. Retrieved on 20 Mar 2015.

Electromagnetic lock.” Wikipedia. Retrieved on 17 Mar 2015.

Kabuki Solenoid.” Innovation Productions. Retrieved on 21 Mar 2015.

Holding Magnet.” Flints Theatrical Chandlers. Flint Hire & Supply LTD. Retrieved on 21 Mar 2015.

Armature Plates.” Flints Theatrical Chandlers. Flint Hire & Supply LTD. Retrieved on 21 Mar 2015.

Fragoso, Jesus Chuy. “Kabuki Stage Setting Release Device.” Google Patent. Retrieved on 20 Mar 2015.

Double Kabuki Drop Explanation.” YouTube video. Retrieved on 17 Feb 2015.

Electro Kabuki EK2 Series.” Electro Kabuki. Magnet Schultz Ltd in England. Retrieved on 19 Feb 2015.

Kabuki G2 Curtain Drop System Overview.” Gerriets. Retrieved on 21 Mar 2015.

Kabuki G2 Curtain Drop System Components.” Gerriets. Retrieved on 21 Mar 2015.

Kabuki 50.” ShowTex. Retrieved on 21 Mar 2015.

Double Kabuki Drop System

BYU Men’s Basketball 2013 Kabuki Drop.” YouTube video. Retrieved on 18 Mar 2015.

Lynda. “Focus On: Double Kabuki Drapes.” Sew What? Inc. Blog. Retrieved on 15 Mar 2015.

Manufacturers

Manual Kabuki Drop Systems

Pro Magic Kabuki Drop System

Linear Solenoid Kabuki Drop Systems

Gerriets

Rose Brand

Chabuki

iWeiss

Magic FX

Rent What? Inc.

Showtex

SGA

Joseph C. Hansen Co.

Electromagnetic Lock Kabuki Drop Systems

Electro Kabuki

ESP Support

 

 

Disclaimer: This is a free resource site for educational purposes. To better illustrate points made in the articles, images have been used to accompany the information. Photo credits and links to the source material are given where applicable.

If you are a copyright holder for any of the images and do not want your image used in this resource site, please contact us at info(a)magickabukidrop.com and we will remove the image within 24 hours.

The authors accepts no responsibility for damages or injuries resulting from the fabrication or performance of any of the Kabuki Drop methods described in this website.

The Ultimate Business Book for Entertainers & Performers

“The Showbiz Master Plan” is the most all-encompassing business book written for entertainers & performers including musicians, comedians and variety entertainers.

One of the biggest challenges that creative artists face is fully tapping the commercial potential of their skills and expertise. Maximizing earnings is often elusive for many performing artists & entertainers, regardless of the level of the act.

Have you ever felt:

  • You should be charging more for your shows but either feel you can’t or are afraid to
  • You are losing gigs to competitors who are charging less than you
  • You have the talent and have worked incredibly hard at your art but are not getting that lucky break
  • You are not getting the recognition you deserve as a performing artist
  • You need greater financial stability and security, especially for your future
  • You have a fan following but are not making big money
  • Your career has stagnated and has not progressed in the last few years
  • You are not getting consistent bookings

If the above thoughts are on your mind, you are not alone. Many talented new and seasoned performing artists & entertainers around the world feel exactly the same way.

The Showbiz Master Plan Cover

 

 
The goal of any entertainer is to bring joy to people but most will agree that making money is also important. While the notion of a struggling artist is a common perception of the realities of show business, it does not have to be the case.

The truth is; while there are many entertainers who barely make ends meet each month, there are also many entertainers around the world who make a decent living from their art or craft.

In fact, there are also many entertainers around the world who are very successful and financially comfortable. These highly successful entertainers may not be A-list international celebrities, movie stars or recording artists, but are giants in their respective specialized fields or cities/ countries.

One thing many of these entertainers have in common is the strategy and approach to their business and careers. They all understand that show business is not just about the show but also about the business.

Headline Entertainer, J C Sum (www.jcsum.com), has spent the past 23 years (and counting) performing around the world and currently works as a headline entertainer primarily in Asia as well as Europe and the Middle East. J C has starred in his own network television series and made multiple international TV appearances. More than 120 million people have seen his magic live and on TV in 26 countries.

J C has written down everything he has learnt and practiced in the past two decades that has made him one of the very elite illusionists in Asia. “The Showbiz Master Plan” is a live entertainer’s blueprint to creating a money-generating brand, making a consistent 6-figure income and setting up for retirement.

This book is filled with incredible stories, practical advice, time-tested tips and market-proven action-steps on how to build a successful career as a performing artist and live entertainer.

With “The Showbiz Master Plan”, learn how to:

  • Be a Successful Creative Entrepreneur
  • Build Your Brand
  • Dominate Your Niche Market
  • Harness the Power of Positioning
  • Price & Negotiate Big Money Shows
  • Find Your Big Break
  • Grow Your Business
  • Get Paid Without Performing
  • Invest for Your Future
  • Handle Career Challenges and Failure

This book was written to benefit all types of entertainers such as Aerialists, Balloon Artistes, Bands, Circus Acts, Comedians, Contortionists, Dancers, Escape Artists, Face Painters, Hypnotists, Illusionists, Impersonators, Instrumentalists, Jugglers, Magicians, Mime Artists, Musicians, Singers, Variety Artists, Ventriloquists & Vocalists.

6” x 9”. 55,000 words. 229 pages.

The book is available in two formats:

  • eBOOK (PDF): US$39.90
  • Print Book for US$49.90 + shipping.

Read the reviews and order the book from our shop HERE.